Fashion

Nails Protection: The 3 Best Things to Do for Your Nails

Nails Protection:- Nature gave us nails to help us grasp things. But our civilized existence has mostly diminished the need for pins. There are, in fact, many fellow human beings who have no nails at all-due to significant infections, congenital skin diseases, severe psoriasis, and so forth -and still manage to get through life.

Here now are some fascinating facts about fingernails. To begin with, the nail itself is dead. It produced skin tissue at the base of the nail, much as its follicle creates the hair. And like hair, there is nothing you can put directly onto the pin that will affect its growth at all.

Nails Protection 3 Best Things

Fingernails grow faster than toenails, but all nail grows at its rate. Your nails are also individually susceptible to the nail dangers itemized below. Each pin is unique unto itself, and it’s often possible to have problems with some nails, while others remain unaffected.

The average growth rate of a human nail is between .1 and .12 millimetres per day. This fact determined by an observant dermatologist from Iowa who spent over fifty years calibrating nail growth on a day-to-day basis.

Nails Protection

Other dermatologists have discovered that pregnancy, summer weather, and trauma (ranging from hammer blows to compulsive nail chewing) all tend to make nails grow faster.

Your general rate of nail growth is fastest during your second decade, and the price declines after that. As the year passes, more and more calcium gathers in the nails.

The 3 Best Things to Do for Your Nails

But calcium, contrary to the popular myth, does not contribute to harder nails. Quite the contrary, it makes them brittle—as any older person will attest.

Nor does the ingestion of gelatin have any known effect on the nails. Nails, like hair, are almost pure protein, which is why the myth of the benefits of drinking gelatin (also pure protein) has persisted so long. The problem is that the gelatin you drink doesn’t affect the skin from which the nail grows.

Nails Protection

Nails are incredibly porous and can absorb one hundred times as much water as an equal amount of skin. Nails soak up everything liquid, including nail polish. Nail preparations tested so thoroughly that there’s rarely a danger in their use.

Occasionally quick-drying preparations can dehydrate and crack the nails, or residual polish can cause slight stains on the surface, but these are not frequent complaints.

1. Correcting the most common things

What follows are sections devoted to identifying and correcting the most common things that can go wrong with your nails.

Paronychia

Nails Protection, when the skin at the base of your nail becomes infected, the resulting swelling and inflammation are called paronychia. Not only does the inflammation make the skin tender and painful, but since nails grow out of this tissue, severe paronychia will produce dystrophy, or misshaping, of the nails. Dystrophic nails can be indented, spotted, spooned, split, and generally ugly.

People whose hands are wet all day are prime candidates for paronychia, also called barmaid’s finger, since digits dipped in beer all day almost inevitably contract yeast infections. But anyone who works with lots of water-including homemakers—is susceptible. Paronychia is so common that many people ignore it, thereby risking disfigurement of the nails.

The main thing to do for paronychia is to keep the hands as dry as possible. Decrease daily hand washings and buy finger cots, those little rubber caps that fit over the tip of each finger. Their only drawback is that some fingers become irritated by the finger cot rubber or become uncomfortably sweaty.

Another way to cure paronychia is with an OTC drug called Bacitracin. It is a “broad spectrum” antibiotic and is often useful in combating the infection and reducing tissue inflammation. Apply the Bacitracin several times a day.

For awful cases, you might consider having your doctor inject medicine directly into the inflamed tissue. It will counter the inflammation and help to avoid possible future nail disfigurement. Whatever you do, it’s imperative to dry up the skin on those hands now and to protect the inflamed fingers from future wetness.

Onycholysis

If your nails are separating from the tissue that lies beneath them (called the nail bed), then you’ve got onycholysis. It’s a widespread problem, but there is no regimen I can prescribe to cure it. The cure rests in accurately identifying and removing the cause, then allowing the nail to grow back.

Bacterial and fungal infections are the usual cause for separating nails. They resist topical antibiotics, so your doctor will have to give you prescription pills. Occasionally, people have allergic reactions to specific nail hardeners or the glue used on artificial nails.

These reactions lead to oedema and swelling of the nail bed. (Edema, you will remember, is the name for the fluid that accompanies inflamed tissue.) Swelling and oedema in the nail bed will dislodge, thereby causing onycholysis.

Or the cause might be a photoallergic reaction resulting from the combination of some medicine you’re taking and sun exposure. People tend to forget that nails are one of the most exposed parts of the body.

It’s quite common for a person to be taking a medication and have no noticeable reactions until he or she exposed to bright sunshine. Sometimes thyroid disease and iron deficiency will cause onycholysis also.

When nails begin to separate, many patients worry whether to pull them out, cut them back, or tape them down. What you should do is go directly to your doctor to determine the cause. He’ll prescribe the appropriate treatment and the nails will heal themselves. It doesn’t much matter what you do with the already damaged part of the nail.

2. Slow Growth and Brittleness

Nails that are flaky, prone to chip, full of white spots, slow-growing, or pitted can result from any one or a combination of the following. Far too often it’s a matter of a stress-related habit. Flick your nails all day, every day, for long enough, and they’ll look terrible. If it’s not nerves, it might be a skin disease like psoriasis, a fungal infection, or poor blood circulation.

Again, if there’s an obvious skin problem on the hands, have a doctor prescribe appropriate medicine. At home, try supplementing your diet with iron pills. Be patient; nails are slow growers to start with, so a program of iron will take months before there’s a noticeable improvement.

Best Things to Do for Your Nails

If the nails are unduly pitted or crumbly, try soaking them in a double-strength mixture of gelatin and water. Even though drinking gelatin won’t do anything for nails, soaking them in it will cause temporary hardening and a promptly improved appearance.

Alternately, you can buy combination hardener-lacquers at most drugstores. But remember, your first obligation is to eliminate any disease that may be causing the bad nails.

Here now is a do-it-yourself nail-hardening recipe, but it does, however, require a doctor’s prescription. Your pharmacist will have to prepare it specially, but I include the formula in case your doctor isn’t familiar with it. A pharmacist showed it to me, and I think it’s perfect, mainly since the nails can paint with polish after treatment.

The concoction made from 15% chamomile powder, 35% witch hazel, and 50% Formalin (a preservative), to which a dash of garlic and a drop of brilliant green colour added. It should be applied three times a week. Instead of making a special visit, you might jot the formula down, or mark this page, then ask your doctor or gynaecologist for the prescription the next time you have an appointment.

Caution: some people find this preparation irritating. If that includes you, discontinue using it.

3. Discoloured Nails

In many ways, discolouration is the least severe thing that can happen to your nails. Often Discolored Nails are nothing more than the residue of coloured nail polish that has absorbed into the porous nail. If it bothers you, you can carefully scrape it off with a sharp knife.

Nails Protection

Discoloured Nails Symptoms

Perhaps the most common discolouration of the nails caused by a simple bruise. If the pin struck with or against something hard, the nail bed could bleed, and the blood can become trapped beneath itself. This trapped blood soaks into the porous nail and stays there until the nail grows out.

Discoloured Nails Causes

Some chemicals can stain the nails. Photographic Developing chemicals often blacken them. The resorcin in certain nail lacquers sometimes causes red-black Discolored Nails. These can be corrected merely by discontinuing exposure.

Nature gave us nails to help us grasp things. But our civilized existence has largely diminished the need for nails. There are, in fact, many fellow human beings who have no nails at all-due to major infections, congenital skin diseases, severe psoriasis, and so forth -and still manage to get through life.

Nails Protection

Here now are some fascinating facts about fingernails. To begin with, the nail itself is dead. It produced by the skin tissue at the base of the nail, much as the hair is produced by its follicle. And like hair, there is nothing you can put directly onto the nail that will affect its growth at all.

Fingernails Grow Faster Than Toenails

Fingernails grow faster than toenails, but all nail grows at its own rate. Your nails are also individually susceptible to the nail dangers itemized below. Each nail is unique unto itself, and it’s often possible to have problems with some nails, while others remain unaffected.

The average growth rate of a human nail is between .1 and .12 millimetres per day. This fact determined by an observant dermatologist from Iowa who spent over fifty years calibrating nail growth on a day-to-day basis. Other dermatologists have discovered that pregnancy, summer weather, and trauma (ranging from hammer blows to compulsive nail chewing) all tend to make nails grow faster.

Your general rate of nail growth is fastest during your second decade, and the price declines after that. As the year passes, more and more calcium gathers in the nails. But calcium, contrary to the popular myth, does not contribute to harder nails. Quite the contrary, it makes them brittle—as any older person will attest.

Also Read: How Your Shoes Identify Who You Are

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Also Read: 10 Common Plants that have Healing Features

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